People

Wendy Schmidt is President of The Schmidt Family Foundation, whose mission is to support the transition from an old understanding of energy and natural resources to one that reflects new values for the 21st Century based on our growing knowledge of the interdependence of human and natural systems. Recognizing that interdependence extends to community wellbeing as well, Wendy began ReMain Nantucket as a foundation project in 2008.

Wendy is a trustee of the NRDC, The XPrize Foundation, Climate Central, The California Academy of Sciences, The Nantucket Dreamland Foundation, and GRIST, serving as co-chair of the Communications Committee. She has a Master’s degree in Journalism from The University of California at Berkeley, and graduated Magna cum laude from Smith College. She has worked previously in high-tech marketing communications and as an interior designer, specializing in residential interiors.

Melissa Philbrick moved to Nantucket in 1986 with her husband and two young children to practice law.  In 1996, she opened her own law firm with a primarily real estate-based practice.  She has worked with ReMain Nantucket since its formation, and in 2009 left the practice of law to become its Executive Director. 

Melissa has served on a variety of Nantucket non-profit boards.  She graduated from Brown University and received her law degree from Columbia University School of Law. 

Rachel Hobart, a summer resident of the Island since 1968, moved to Nantucket in 1987 to practice law. She took a break from the law to raise her three children, and was a partner in the opening of Fahey and Fromagerie, a gourmet wine and food store. Rachel started with ReMain in May of 2008. 

She has served on the board of several local non-profits, including Small Friends On Nantucket, The Children’s House, The Nantucket Atheneum, and currently and most extensively, The Nantucket New School, where she is a Vice President. Rachel graduated from Yale University and received her law degree from Northeastern University School of Law.

As a frequent visitor who embraced Nantucket’s spirit since 1989, Virna established her roots as a 'wash-a-shore' in 2002. She brought many skills as a business entrepreneur from her New York City graphic design firm to the cobblestones of Main Street by managing a retail shop, applying business, accounting and graphic design at a real estate firm, and now to her work at ReMain.

Since starting at ReMain in October 2008, all of her creativity, business and public relation capabilities are utilized to benefit the community she loves to support. Virna received her BFA from St. John's University in 1989. She worked at The MacNeil/Lehrer Newshour, Computer Associates, and Penguin Books as an assistant art director before attaining her own design accounts with American Tourister, Samsonite, CNBC, TV Food, The New Group and Latina/Essence Magazine.

She served on the board of the Nantucket Arts Council and most currently serves on the board of the Nantucket Education Trust.

ReMain Ventures Construction and Business Manager

ReMain Nantucket is an island-based organization established by Wendy Schmidt, President of The Schmidt Family Foundation.

Our charitable activities are conducted as an offshoot of The Schmidt Family Foundation. Entrepreneurial venture projects and real estate development are implemented as private, rather than foundation, investments.

Under the ReMain umbrella, both charitable philanthropic activity and venture investment help to envision and empower a prosperous future for the heart of Nantucket - tapping the Island's extraordinary resources: its people and strong tradition of independence, innovation, and conservation.

Contact

ReMain Nantucket Office Location:
58 Main Street, 2nd Floor

Main Office Line:
508.901.4140

ReMain Ventures Office Location:
50 Main Street, 2nd Floor

Main Office Line:
508.901.4145

Mailing Address:
ReMain Nantucket, LLC
P.O Box 359
Nantucket, MA 02554

Please email your inquiries to:
info@remainnantucket.org

ReMain Nantucket is an island-based organization established by Wendy Schmidt, President of The Schmidt Family Foundation.

Our charitable activities are conducted as an offshoot of The Schmidt Family Foundation. Entrepreneurial venture projects and real estate development are implemented as private, rather than foundation, investments.

Under the ReMain umbrella, both charitable philanthropic activity and venture investment help to envision and empower a prosperous future for the heart of Nantucket - tapping the Island's extraordinary resources: its people and strong tradition of independence, innovation, and conservation.

What's New?

Anita Walker, Executive Director of the MA Cultural Council spoke at the Atheneum. Read more...

Construction has commenced on the new Culinary Center at 22 Federal Street. Read more in our 'Ventures' section under '22 Federal'.

Learn without Leaving.  ReMain is pleased to team up with the University of Massachusetts and the Nantucket Community School to better understand the education and workforce needs of Nantucket’s residents and visitors.  This fall, through surveys, focus groups, and personal interviews, the consulting firm of EDRG compiled information and is documenting those needs. Read more...

Nantucket Community School and Nantucket Community Music Center opened the doors at 56 Centre Street for their classes and other programs in the beginning of May.
Check their websites for programming and to sign up for classes.

ReMain Nantucket is an island-based organization established by Wendy Schmidt, President of The Schmidt Family Foundation.

Our charitable activities are conducted as an offshoot of The Schmidt Family Foundation. Entrepreneurial venture projects and real estate development are implemented as private, rather than foundation, investments.

Under the ReMain umbrella, both charitable philanthropic activity and venture investment help to envision and empower a prosperous future for the heart of Nantucket - tapping the Island's extraordinary resources: its people and strong tradition of independence, innovation, and conservation.

ReMain Nantucket

our Ideas and Initiatives

Combining the creativity of a think tank with the energy of an advocacy organization, ReMain is committed to supporting the evolution of a healthy, year round community on Nantucket that flourishes in its iconic downtown.  By supporting resourceful thinking and objective research aimed at strengthening downtown Nantucket's future, we are building on the Island's own traditions of independent and innovative thinking, adding expertise from a worldwide network.

We believe that learning has always been at the center of our island community and have invested in that premise through our work at 56 Centre and 22 Federal. We have collaborated with University of Massachusetts and the Nantucket Community School on programming in the downtown for the past several years, and in 2014 are working with them on this joint research project.

The consulting firm of EDR Group has been commissioned to study the educational needs of Nantucket’s year-round and seasonal residents called the Learn Without Leaving study.  This fall, through surveys, focus groups, and personal interviews, EDR Group compiled information and is documenting those needs, so that future programming can be targeted at areas of the greatest demand. As part of this research, our collaborators had surveyed online anyone and everyone who has thoughts on this subject.

Our hope is that students of all ages and backgrounds, residents or just here for a few days or a few months will inhabit our town, patronize our shops and restaurants and share their experiences as they learn and grow. EDR Group will release their executive summary on December 15th.

Following up on requests from the downtown business community, a Steering Committee of downtown stakeholders oversaw the work of a consultant, Rich Turer, in 2012-2013 to learn the needs of the businesses and non-profits in the downtown, and work with them to develop a plan for the future to make downtown can become more vibrant, more accessible, and more profitable in all seasons. After establishing his office in the downtown, Rich coordinated studies, conducted workshops, worked with community leaders, and interviewed business and non-profit owners and staff. His final report and information about his process can be found at his website www.acktown.com.

Ann Burke, Vice President of the Economic Development Council of Western MA and Director of the HomeField Advantage Program hosted a workshop and a public discussion on Nantucket in March, 2012. Ann's visit to the Island was prompted by downtown merchants who want to explore different ways to organize the downtown business association to promote long-term year-round sustainability of the downtown business district. Her recommendations have led to Rich Turer's further research into ways to create a sustainable mechanism to manage and enhance the downtown business district. 

The Urban Land Institute is a non-profit educational and research institution with 40,000 members nationwide, including architects, engineers, land developers, planners, and urban designers. In October 2008, a nine-person volunteer advisory panel was invited to Nantucket by ReMain to help our community and local leaders address specific planning challenges.

The panel reviewed a 360 page briefing book prepared by ReMain, and spent nearly a week assessing the Island. They interviewed and read comments from more than 200 Islanders, soliciting their views on such important downtown issues as traffic congestion, parking, and summer and year round business conditions. The input they received shaped their recommendations about how best to strengthen downtown Nantucket.

An overflow audience at the Atheneum's Great Hall attended the panel's presentation of its preliminary recommendations. The Panel's final report can be downloaded and is available at the ReMain office.

ReMain extends its thanks to the many community members who gave their time to be interviewed by the panel and shared thoughtful written comments.

Downtown Employee Survey

 
During the summer of 2009, ReMain Nantucket conducted an informal survey of businesses and organizations to determine how many people work in the central downtown area, taking seasonal variability into account.  While the primary purpose of the study was to understand the number of employees working in the downtown, some of the businesses surveyed were willing to supply additional information which may be helpful in discussions regarding downtown parking issues.
ReMain Nantucket also commissioned a formal study by University of Connecticut's Center for Transportation and Urban Planning to better understand attitudes about the use of public transportation during the summer season, to identify and quantify the barriers that exist, and to develop a set of recommended strategies for increasing the use of public transit. At the same time, the Town of Nantucket conducted an evaluation of parking utilization in the downtown area.
The Downtown Employee Survey fills in a gap that was not covered in the scope of either the UConn study or the Town's parking study, and just focused on finding the number of employees who work in the downtown district. 

Study Area
We surveyed those streets in the downtown which have most of the shops and restaurants: Broad; Cambridge; Centre to Broad; Chestnut; Easy; Federal; India to Black-Eyed Susan's; Main to Centre; Oak; S Water; Straight Wharf; Salem; Union to Force 5 Sports; Washington to Greenhound.

We are always looking to enhance multi-modal forms of transportation and to alleviate downtown traffic congestion. In addition to providing increased bike parking at Greenhound and funding for additional bike racks in the downtown, we have been working with the Nantucket Planning Office to encourage and facilititate the construction of a downtown link to the Island's bike path system. In 2012, our intern who provided background research for the Town's Downtown Bike Path project.

We continued our collaboration with the Town of Nantucket to explore the barriers to summertime access to town due to traffic and parking, and the impacts of congestion on the economic health of downtown and the quality of life for all those who are on Island during the high season.

In 2010 & 2011, transportation experts from Nelson/Nygaard analyzed the many studies that have been completed on the subject, and received extensive input from interested year round and seasonal residents during public workshops that the N/N team hosted. Nelson|Nygaard presented a seasonal model for downtown parking based on this input and the Town's parking utilization data from Tetra Tech Rizzo in the spring of 2011. Brochures that were handed out at the workshops as well as a more detailed analysis of the proposal are available.

You can watch Nelson/Nygaard’s entire presentation with recommendations regarding a program to manage the demand for parking during the busy summer season, as well as possible pilot programs to test various technologies and other aspects of the program

The Board of Selectmen, working the Nantucket Planning and Economic Development Commission, will be exploring which, if any, of the suggested initiatives are worthy of implementation. One of N/N’s recommendations, a valet parking program, was piloted in 2011 and will be continued in 2012.

In 2009 ReMain Nantucket commissioned a formal study by University of Connecticut's Center for Transportation and Urban Planning to better understand attitudes about the use of public transportation during the summer season, to identify and quantify the barriers that exist, and to develop a set of recommended strategies for increasing the use of public transit.

At a well-attended presentation at The Atheneum in December 2009, Norman W. Garrick, an Associate Professor and Director of The Center for Transportation and Urban Planning at the University of Connecticut, praised Nantucket's seasonal bus system and said it was reliable, clean and safe and is rated highly by its users. "The existing bus system is well-run and well-designed," said Dr. Garrick. "I was very impressed when I arrived to begin my work."

Garrick's team was on-island at three different times the summer of 2009, surveying public attitudes towards transportation. Overall, the team gathered the views of 742 people. His report at The Great Hall was a chance for the public to hear some of his conclusions.

ReMain has followed up on several of Garrick's recommendations, outlined in his report summary "A Plan for Growing Transit on Nantucket", by continuing to work with NRTA on enhancing the visibility of the system and by funding research through Nelson/Nygaard on new directions for managed parking.

During the summer of 2009, ReMain Nantucket conducted an informal survey of businesses and organizations to determine how many people work in the central downtown area, taking seasonal variability into account. The primary purpose of the study was to understand the number of employees working in the downtown and to understand how transit and parking are utilized during fluctuating seasons. Some of the businesses surveyed were willing to supply additional information which may be helpful in other research related discussions.

During the fall of 2010, the Town of Nantucket requested the financial support needed to create an Energy Office. In keeping with our philosophy that resourceful thinking and objective research will help strengthen Nantucket’s future, we provided funding to found the Nantucket Energy Office. Our goal was to help the Town communicate with the public on a wide range of energy-related subjects and acquire the technical assistance needed to provide informed choices with respect to energy efficiency and “renewables” projects.

The Nantucket Energy Office was established in July, 2011, and is now fully funded by the Town.  It works to identify and implement energy efficiency, conservation and renewable energy programs that are economically viable, environmentally responsible and socially beneficial for Nantucket. The Office is now fully funded by the Town, operates under the direction of Town Administration and works closely with the Nantucket Energy Committee.

Nantucket owes its very existence to the sea. ReMain recognizes the essential connection between the harbor as our deep water port and the historic downtown because a healthy harbor, clean beaches and bountiful waters form the foundation of our local economy-for fishing, recreation, tourism and transport. We support efforts to protect the environmental integrity of our harbor and the waters that surround us. Ultimately, the future of our harbor, our town and the surrounding waters is interconnected.

Concerned about the potential impacts of nutrient loading on the harbor and committed to expert independent research on important issues facing our community, in 2010 ReMain joined with the Nantucket Community Association, Nantucket Yacht Club, Great Harbor Yacht Club, Anglers Club, Nantucket Conservation Foundation and various individuals, in funding a Water Quality Monitoring Project through the Town of Nantucket's Marine and Coastal Resources Department. The Town continues the important work of ongoing water quality monitoring project.

ReMain has hosted various presentations about water quality monitoring and the scientific research that is being conducted in the harbor, and has funded research on topics ranging from bay scallop propagation to algae blooms.   

The Greenhound Building located at 10 Washington Street acts as a transportation hub, which enhances our partnership with the Nantucket Regional Transportation Authority (NRTA) and its bus system known as The Wave. Greenhound also provides shelter, public restrooms, and transportation assistance from late June through Labor Day. In a recent study that looked at improving public transit, the Massachusetts Department of Transportation praised the NRTA thematic system map as the best in the state and noted that the website is well designed with easy to find information and an excellent comprehensive rider’s guide and mobile application.

‘Ride The Wave’ The Nantucket Regional Transit Authority unveiled its new name and image "The Wave" in May 2011. Residents and visitors participated in a contest to help re-brand the system, and the winning entries were submitted by Ruth Anne Biggs, Bruce Miller and Pat Kleinert. 

We enjoyed collaborating with NRTA on this project and are pleased that the new look made the system even more rider-friendly. In 2011, the Wave saw a 9% increase in ridership.

As part of the 2011 improvements to the NRTA system, we helped develop and launch a free “Where's My Bus?" app for smart phones and Blackberry’s. Riders can access real time tracking, bus routes that show stops along the way, arrival and departure times, and up-to-the-minute announcements, all of which contribute to the best rider experience possible. Go to live.nrtawave.com to download or scan the QR code with your smartphone or QR Scanner.

Two hybrid buses with engines that reduce both carbon and CO2 emissions and use less fuel were added to the fleet in 2011. The additional capital cost for the upgrade to a hybrid engine on one of the buses was funded by a grant from Greenhound; the second hybrid bus was funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). These two buses complement the other environmentally friendly, low sulphur diesel vehicles in the fleet.

NRTA’s diesel engines for the entire fleet meet the most current emissions requirements from the Environmental Protection Agency by using ultra low sulphur diesel (ULSD) fuel, and being equipped with particular filters which remove pollutants from the exhaust.

Bus shelters were provided by ReMain at two busy bus stops - Surfside Road across the street from The Muse and on Milestone Road near Tom Nevers. Riders at these stops now have a dignified place to wait for The Wave in any weather condition. The shelters were designed in consultation with the Nantucket Historic District Commission and the Tom Never’s stop is lighted by solar power.

Nantucket Community School and ReMain have been working together to bring adult education classes in the downtown since 2009.  Now the Community School's downtown campus has opened at 56 Centre Street.  Adult education classes in computer skills and foreign languages, as well as parenting and other programs, have found a home in the new facilities at 56 Centre.  

If you have any questions or want to learn more about upcoming classes, call Janelle D'Aprix at 508-228-7285 ext. 1571.

For over 37 years, the Nantucket Community Music Center  has enriched the cultural life of Nantucket through community performances, diversified music education, and most recently, music therapy programming.  NCMC serves approximately 100 people both young and old with 15 instructors privately. More than 60 Nantucketers participate in jazz, orchestra and choir ensembles.

Teachers, students and ensemble groups now gather under one roof in their new home at 56 Centre Street. This renovated building provides space for new collaborations, individualized and group instruction, and additional programming, including a recording studio.

In January 2013, ReMain facilitated the collaboration of non-profits and businesses to welcome the students and faculty of UMass Boston's School for the Environment to downtown for a pilot program semester of "Living Labs Nantucket". These students enlivened the quiet winter streets, dined at the restaurants that stay open year round and enjoyed evenings at the movies all while researching our unique island ecosystems. Students use our Greenhound Building as one of their downtown classrooms and meeting space.

In it's third season, the "Living Labs Nantucket" program will continue into this coming winter season from January 2015-April 2015.


The Nantucket Food Pantry provides food to persons with little or no income to help them feed themselves and their families until their circumstances improve. Support was extended to 3,726 people in FY2014.

We are proud to house this essential non-profit organization in Greenhound Building, accessed year-round via the building’s east entrance on Candle Street.

 

Mitchells Book Corner functions as a cornerstone business in the downtown year-round, beloved by generations of seasonal and full-time residents as well as thousands of summer visitors. In the spring of 2012, Wendy Hudson, the owner of Nantucket Bookworks on Broad Street and one of the organizers of Nantucket’s Book Festival, created Nantucket Book Partners to run both Mitchells Book Corner and Nantucket Bookworks as full-service, year-round bookstores. Hudson is an enthusiastic advocate for the future of independent bookselling on the island and believes that Mitchell’s Book Corner and Nantucket Bookworks can each retain their own unique personalities, and by functioning cooperatively we’ll be able to strengthen both entities and offer even more for the island’s readers.

In a recent press release, founder Wendy Schmidt was quoted: “At ReMain, we like to incubate new endeavors that inspire and support the next generation in a changing marketplace, and we also want to support downtown’s key institutions to help ensure they are in place for the long term. Since we purchased Mitchell’s in 2008, the bookselling business has seen unprecedented market shifts in the explosive popularity of e-readers and the success of online giants like Amazon.com. Independent booksellers in every market are working overtime to develop sustainable business models for their stores. Here on Nantucket, we are exceptionally fortunate to have two independent bookstores, and now, for them to combine forces, while maintaining their individual characters, is a realistic approach for successfully engaging this industry-wide challenge.”

Mitchells Book Corner still functions as a cornerstone business in the downtown year-round, beloved by generations of seasonal and full-time residents as well as thousands of summer visitors. In the spring of 2012, Wendy Hudson, the owner of Nantucket Bookworks on Broad Street and one of the organizers of Nantucket’s first Book Festival in June 2012, created Nantucket Book Partners to run both Mitchells Book Corner and Nantucket Bookworks as full-service, year-round bookstores. Hudson is an enthusiastic advocate for the future of independent bookselling on the island and believes that Mitchell’s Book Corner and Nantucket Bookworks can each retain their own unique personalities, and by functioning cooperatively we’ll be able to strengthen both entities and offer even more for the island’s readers.

In a recent press release, founder Wendy Schmidt was quoted: “At ReMain, we like to incubate new endeavors that inspire and support the next generation in a changing marketplace, and we also want to support downtown’s key institutions to help ensure they are in place for the long term. Since we purchased Mitchell’s in 2008, the bookselling business has seen unprecedented market shifts in the explosive popularity of e-readers and the success of online giants like Amazon.com. Independent booksellers in every market are working overtime to develop sustainable business models for their stores. Here on Nantucket, we are exceptionally fortunate to have two independent bookstores, and now, for them to combine forces, while maintaining their individual characters, is a realistic approach for successfully engaging this industry-wide challenge.”

The Nantucket Comedy Festival brings more than laughter into Town. This festival underwrites the mentoring and comedic educational programming for youths through Stand-Up And Learn. Workshops such as Telling Stories, Organizing Your Routine and Stepping Onstage encourage kids to develop life skills and self-confidence.

The Nantucket Comedy Festival mitigates the impact of the event by implementing green practices through its purchasing, printing, waste production and recycling with the encouragement of ReMain's Sustainability Guidelines. Their green awareness education and promotions help all of us understand how we can make a positive effect on our footprint while still having fun.

Each year Nantucket Preservation Trust opens kitchens in a downtown neighborhood, which educates about the significance of Nantucket’s historic houses and broadens knowledge about designing new as well as retaining historic kitchens in old houses.

In sponsoring NPT’s Summer Kitchens House Tour this year, we are confident that those who participate will walk the streets with a deeper appreciation for this unique built environment, but also for the community that continues to live and gather in downtown Nantucket.  For we believe that a working downtown and historic preservation both strengthen lasting economic, environmental and social vitality.

The Nantucket Garden Festival benefits Nantucket Lighthouse School, an independent day school serving island children, pre-school through 8th grade.  Founded in 1999, Nantucket Lighthouse School provides a developmentally appropriate education that engages the whole child – head, heart, and hand.  The concept for the Nantucket Garden Festival was born out of the Lighthouse School’s unique curriculum and organic garden, which provides an outdoor, hands-on classroom for acquiring skills in everything from language arts to science and mathematics.

Nantucket Race Week is hosted at the Nantucket Yacht Club and the Great Harbor Yacht Club to benefit Nantucket Community Sailing, a non-profit, educational organization that provides affordable access to sailing and water sports to the public.

Race Week continues to educate the public and its participants about the need to protect our harbor and the sea that surrounds us as we use the water recreationally. The races were certified as 'Clean Regattas' under the standards established by Sailors for the Sea. The result: less waste and less debris in the water and on the shore, and a reduction in the many diffuse sources of water pollution that degrade the health of the ocean.

Through its sponsorship of Race Week, ReMain Nantucket hopes to create an awareness of the ties that bind our historic downtown and our harbor, the Island and the ocean beyond and focus attention on the importance of respecting the environmental integrity of our harbor which affords recreational opportunities to any and all and provides a critical link with the mainland. Ultimately, the future of our downtown, our harbor and the ocean that surrounds us, is interconnected. The success of each contributes to the other, as a rising tide floats all boats.

In its 31st year, the Iron Teams Relay event highlights how environmentally-low impact modes of transportation -running, biking and swimming- generate a positive impact on our physical well-being. We work with the Town and NRTA to improve how we move around Nantucket, enhancing connections between the harbor, downtown and the rest of the Island, while reducing our environmental footprint. We encourage residents and visitors alike to explore Nantucket gently . . . by foot, by bike, by bus, by boat.

Mentoring Youth Nantucket, the charitable beneficiary of the Iron Teams event focuses on building ties between different ages and strengthening the social connections within the community, which echoes the types of interaction ReMain Nantucket fosters by supporting downtown as a place where the Nantucket community can come together and connect.

The Nantucket Theatre Workshop with their exceptional productions, seen by audiences for over 50 years, continues to be essential to the vitality of the core downtown. In the past year alone, more than 10,000 audience members traveled to town to view their performances.

In 2012, TWN plans eight productions along with several one person shows and non-profit collaborations with the Nantucket Historical Association and Nantucket Atheneum. We support their passion to grow their audience, encourage local and visiting artists, and enrich our community through each season’s productions, the LunaFest and the Moby Dick performance at the NHA.

ReMain proudly supports these Nantucket non-profits and municipal organizations that hold events downtown.

ReMain sponsors charitable 501(c)(3) organizations, programs and events that support downtown as the place where the Nantucket community - both seasonal and year-round - connects and comes together. Learn more about our Event Sponsorship Criteria.
Organizations which are sponsored must be willing to make a Pledge of Sustainability and are provided with Sustainability Guidelines which are intended to help event organizers reduce the environmental impact of their events, introduce sustainability into their purchasing and operational decisions and demonstrate the power of environmental stewardship to their audience.

The Nantucket Public Schools are now partially powered by wind. In September 2010, Alteris Renewables constructed a 100-kilowatt turbine between the football field and back parking lot of Nantucket High School through collaborative funding from Massachusetts Clean Energy Center and The Schmidt Family Foundation and donated services from Cape Cod Express, Victor Paving, National Grid and Baines & Jones.

With the extremely favorable wind conditions on Nantucket, the High School’s Northwind 100 direct-drive turbine manufactured in Barre, Vermont, began operating full time November 19, 2010 and as of mid-May 2012 has produced 318,016 kilowatt hours of power. Annually, the turbine has created about 12% percent of the combined annual energy requirement of the Nantucket High School and the Cyrus Peirce Middle School.

As an additional benefit, the wind turbine provides a platform for a renewable energy curriculum in the public school system. A kiosk has been installed to provide students with access to current data regarding the turbine's role in supplying energy to the school.

When ReMain sponsors an event, the organizers must be willing to make a Pledge of Sustainability and are provided with Sustainability Guidelines which are intended to help event organizers reduce the environmental impact of their events, introduce sustainability into their purchasing and operational decisions and demonstrate the power of environmental stewardship to their audience. 

Through this program we’ve seen organizers not only implement eco-friendly practices but we have learned of newly developed initiatives they are willing to share for the benefit of other non-profit organizations. This camaraderie has been a great common denominator to the good will we all have towards the health of our community. Feel free to read our guidelines and please share your own sustainable ideas and practices with us!

Author and internet sensation Annie Leonard spoke at the Nantucket Atheneum about our society's obsession with stuff, its effects on our communities and our health — and a vision for change. During a visit to the Nantucket landfill, Annie also spoke with Plum TV to share her insights and look at how Nantucket deals with its own stuff.

In December 2007, Annie released The Story of Stuff, a hit 20-minute webfilm that which asks the question, "Do you own your stuff, or does your stuff own you?" and takes viewers on a provocative and eye-opening tour of the often hidden costs of our consumer driven culture. Today, with over 15 million views and counting, The Story of Stuff is one of the most watched environmental-themed online movies of all time.

Sylvia Earle, Explorer in Residence at the National Geographic Society and former chief scientist of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), addressed a capacity audience during her talk on August 13, 2009, at the Nantucket Atheneum, many of whom had received a copy of Sea Change: A Message of the Oceans, as customers of Mitchell's Book Corner and Nantucket Bookworks

Dr. Earle has been a lifelong advocate for undersea research. She has been widely recognized and honored for her work to raise public awareness of the effects of pollution and environmental degradation on the ocean and to establish global network of marine protected areas.

Dr. Earle, also author of children’s books, Hello, Fish! and Dive!, began her afternoon at the Atheneum by sharing a slide show with children and their families.

Bill McDonough, author of Cradle to Cradle, spoke to a packed house in the Great Hall of the Atheneum on August 22, 2008 at an event co-sponsored by ReMain Nantucket, the Nantucket Atheneum, Sustainable Nantucket, Mitchell’s Book Corner and Nantucket Bookworks. Bill’s message of refocusing the way we think and act toward a sustainable future is central to the mission of ReMain Nantucket.

Anita Walker gave a public presentation on What Does It Mean To Become A Cultural District & How Do We Benefit? in the Nantucket Atheneum's Great Hall on Monday, December 8th.  Ms. Walker is the Executive Director of the Massachusetts Cultural Council, which help local arts, humanities, and sciences organizations improve the quality and range of their public programs to enhance the visitor experience, stimulate economic activity and create a higher quality of life. 

The event was co-sponsored by ReMain Nantucket, the Nantucket Arts Council, the Town of Nantucket, the Artists Association of Nantucket, The Nantucket Historical Association and the Nantucket Atheneum.

Kate Levin gave a public presentation on The Impact of Arts and Culture in the Nantucket Atheneum's Great Hall on June 3, 2014.  Ms. Levin is the Cultural Assets Management principal at Bloomberg Associates, a philanthropic consulting firm created to collaborate with cities around the world on improving quality of life for their citizens.  Levin also oversees the Arts Program at Bloomberg Philanthropies

The event was co-sponsored by ReMain Nantucket, the Nantucket Arts Council, the Artists Association of Nantucket, and the Nantucket Atheneum.  In her talk Ms. Levin discussed the value of a culture in a community, and addressed ways to  foster and enhance the arts and cultural communities on Nantucket. 

On June 29, 2011 Doug Loescher lectured in the Great Hall of the Nantucket Atheneum about the critical importance of having vibrant businesses in an historic downtown so that the work of preservationists to protect the built environment and environmentalists seeking to increase the energy efficiency of those buildings does not go to waste. As the Director for the National Trust Main Street Center, he brings more than 25 years of experience in the Main Street revitalization field.

The National Trust's Main Street Center is the leading organization for commercial district revitalization in the country, with more than 1,200 affiliated state and local programs in more than 44 states.  It offers technical services and financial incentives for preservation-based economic development to create a comprehensive menu of support for traditional communities for all sizes from coast-to-coast.  Read more about comprehensive sustainable revitalization initiatives from the Main Street Center.

The event was co-sponsored by ReMain Nantucket, the Nantucket Preservation Trust, and the Nantucket Atheneum.

Nantucket Preservation Trust along with ReMain invited Donovan Rypkema of Place Economics to speak at the Coffin School in September 2009. Mr. Rypkema has lectured widely on economic and preservation issues for downtowns, believing that historic preservation is consistent with environmental responsibility in that the greenest projects are those that recognize the energy imbedded in the existing built environment. Sustainable redevelopment of downtowns is about local jobs as well as historic preservation and energy efficiency.

Paul Bruhn, Executive Director of The Preservation Trust of Vermont, visited Nantucket in January 2009 to share his ideas and experience about keeping historic downtowns relevant in the face of changing lifestyles and retail climates.

Paul met with various community members to explore downtown Nantucket's special attributes as a gathering place for the community. He also discussed specific strategies that his organization has used in Vermont to preserve and protect key business uses, like general stores, which are the heart of many Vermont small towns.

The Preservation Trust of Vermont was founded in 1980 to initiate, stimulate, and assist local and statewide efforts to preserve and use Vermont's rich collection of historic, architectural, cultural and community resources.

The 2011 Living on The Edge: Coastal Communities Conference, entitled "Creating a Blueprint for our Coast", focused on what uses should go where in the nearshore waters and how the tools of coastal and marine spatial planning can provide a rational basis for that decision-making.  Collaborating on the 2011 conference were Massachusetts Ocean Partnership, The Nature Conservancy, Maria Mitchell Association, UMASS Boston Nantucket Field Station, and Urban Harbors Institute.

A sneak preview of the movie Ocean Frontiers:  The Dawn of a New Era in Ocean Stewardship (see the trailer), a groundbreaking film that takes a balanced, bi-partisan approach to the problems we face in managing our oceans was shown during the opening reception. 

In 2010, the Living on The Edge Conference examined the effects of sea level rise on coastal communities and was presented in collaboration with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, The Nature Conservancy, Climate Central, and Maria Mitchell Association.  The forum's focus was to educate decision-makers in government and various impacted industries, as well as the general public, regarding the need to implement appropriate policies as coastal communities enter this century of heightened risk and uncertainty from the impacts of sea level rise.  Watch the video from the 2010 event.

In 2008, ReMain purchased the former Island Spirits property at 10/12 Washington Street to support public transportation initiatives. Our goal was to give the community the time and opportunity to study the best use of this area and experiment with the use of the site as a future transportation hub. We updated the interior of the property using simple green building practices, and partnered with the Nantucket Regional Transportation Authority (NRTA) and The Wave to enable a portion of the property to serve as a downtown bus stop from late June through Labor Day with public restrooms and free Wi-Fi access. In 2010, the property was included by the Town in the Wilkes Square planning exercise, the final report for which is posted on the Town’s website, and by the ULI in their advisory panel’s discussion of possible re-development of that area of downtown.

In 2008, ReMain purchased the former Island Spirits property at 10/12 Washington Street to support public transportation initiatives. Our goal was to give the community the time and opportunity to study the best use of this area and experiment with the use of the site as a future transportation hub. We updated the interior of the property using simple green building practices, and partnered with the Nantucket Regional Transportation Authority (NRTA) and The Wave to enable a portion of the property to serve as a downtown bus stop from late June through Labor Day with public restrooms and free Wi-Fi access. In 2010, the property was included by the Town in the Wilkes Square planning exercise, the final report for which is posted on the Town’s website, and by the ULI in their advisory panel’s discussion of possible re-development of that area of downtown.

Nantucket Community School brings education to the downtown during the school year. Read more about the programs underway in the Greenhound building through our collaborations with NRTA, the Food Pantry, and the Community School. Other non-profits, like the Nantucket Film Festival, use the space for short periods of time during the season to facilitate their downtown event management and bring their constituencies into the space, heightening an awareness of the transit system.

Nantucket Community School brings education to the downtown during the school year. Read more about the programs underway in the Greenhound building through our collaborations with NRTA, the Food Pantry, and the Community School. Other non-profits, like the Nantucket Film Festival, use the space for short periods of time during the season to facilitate their downtown event management and bring their constituencies into the space, heightening an awareness of the transit system.

ReMain Ventures

Our Investments

At ReMain, we believe that investing in Nantucket's uniqueness fosters long term economic, social and environmental value to the island and its residents.

ReMain Ventures seeks to spark for-profit innovation and create jobs that enhance the health of the community year round.

Our projects conserve the historic downtown buildings, improve their energy profile and performance and support institutions that contribute to the vibrant street life of downtown.  Encouraging and mentoring new entrepreneurs to bring their unique business ideas to the downtown creates vitality for town and for the whole community.

Overview of our Investments:  At ReMain, we believe that investing in Nantucket's uniqueness fosters long term economic, social and environmental value to the island and its residents.

ReMain Ventures seeks to spark for-profit innovation and create jobs that enhance the health of the community year round.

Our projects conserve the historic downtown buildings, improve their energy profile and performance and support institutions that contribute to the vibrant street life of downtown.  Encouraging and mentoring new entrepreneurs to bring their unique business ideas to the downtown creates vitality for town and for the whole community.

We are currently issuing a Request for Proposals for an entrepreneurial opportunity at this newly purposed Culinary Center and Cafe.

Centre of Town LLC, a part of ReMain Ventures, is embarking on a major renovation of the building at 22 Federal Street to transform it into a Culinary Center featuring a cafe in the lower level and upper floor space for interactive culinary classes, demonstrations, events, and associated dining and retail sales. We are soliciting proposals from qualified persons who want to run a year-round business at 22 Federal Street in a manner that is consistent with our goals as described in the Request for Proposals.

For a copy of the RFP and supporting materials, which include floor plans and kitchen layouts, contact:

Melissa Philbrick, ReMain Nantucket, 508-901-4141  mphilbrick@remainnantucket.org
50 Main Street, 2nd Floor, P.O. Box 359, Nantucket, MA 02554

Proposals are due October 27, 2014.

Petticoat Row Bakery was launched by ReMain Ventures to provide sweets and local food products year-round. In 2014, the Bakery was recognized as Best Bake Shop on Nantucket by both Cape Cod Life Magazine and the Inquirer and Mirror’s Reader survey. They have also earned a TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence for both 2013 and 2014.

The building at 35 Centre St. was purchased and renovated in 2010 to install a commercial kitchen on the second floor, and create a retail store on the first floor to showcase the products baked upstairs.

The building at 35 Centre St. was purchased and renovated in 2010 to install a commercial kitchen on the second floor, and create a retail store onthe first floor to showcase the products baked upstairs.

[slide show ofthe building: kitchen, retails space, exterior]

56 Centre provides a home for the Nantucket Community Music Center and a new downtown campus for the Nantucket Community School. The lower level of the building contains a computer lab, a multipurpose classroom and rehearsal space, and a recording studio. In addition to being a place where musicians can record, this basement studio provide opportunities for islanders to learn sound engineering as a career or hobby under the auspices of the Nantucket Community Music Center faculty.

The first floor has a parlor for small recitals, presentations, and rehearsals for small ensembles, a child-friendly space where the Community School's parent education programs can be conducted, and offices for both organizations. The second floor houses teaching studios for music school faculty as well as a classroom dedicated to distance learning, through which the Community School plans to establish college credit course offerings by collaborating with off-Island institutions.

56 Centre provides a home for the Nantucket Community Music Center and a new downtown campus for the Nantucket Community School. The lower level of the building contains a computer lab, a multipurpose classroom and rehearsal space, and a recording studio. In addition to being a place where musicians can record, this basement studio provide opportunities for islanders to learn sound engineering as a career or hobby under the auspices of the Nantucket Community Music Center faculty.

The first floor has a parlor for small recitals, presentations, and rehearsals for small ensembles, a child-friendly space where the Community School's parent education programs can be conducted, and offices for both organizations. The second floor houses teaching studios for music school faculty as well as a classroom dedicated to distance learning, through which the Community School plans to establish college credit course offerings by collaborating with off-Island institutions. Of course.

ReMain Nantucket has been working with a design team led by Joe Paul and Doug Mills (BPC Architecture) and Kathleen Hay (Kathleen Hay Designs) since the Zoning Board approved this project during the summer of 2011. With input from the Nantucket Community Music Center and Nantucket Community School faculties and staff, the building's many functions created a need for spaces with many specialized design features, from recording studio equipment, specialty lighting, distance learning AV equipment, and acoustical treatments for sound isolation and to improve the sound qualities of the various spaces. Acentech, Cannon Design, and Boston Light and Sound all contributed heavily to the project both during the design and the construction phases. Julie Wood of Hither Creek Gardening designed a living lawn and a kitchen garden to promote the site's biodiversity, as well as beautiful plantings, walkways and hardscaping. All of the renovations were carefully conducted under the supervision of Scout Construction so as to comply with LEED standard for sustainability, minimizing waste and using readily renewable or recycled products throughout the construction process.

ReMain Nantucket has been working with a design team led by Joe Paul and Doug Mills (BPC Architecture) and Kathleen Hay (Kathleen Hay Designs) since the Zoning Board approved this project during the summer of 2011. With input from the Nantucket Community Music Center and Nantucket Community School faculties and staff, the building's many functions created a need for spaces with many specialized design features, from recording studio equipment, specialty lighting, distance learning AV equipment, and acoustical treatments for sound isolation and to improve the sound qualities of the various spaces.  Acentech, Cannon Design, and Boston Light and Sound all contributed heavily to the project both during the design and the construction phases.  Julie Wood of Hither Creek Gardening designed a living lawn and a kitchen garden to promote the site's biodiversity, as well as beautiful plantings, walkways and hardscaping.  All of the renovations were carefully conducted under the supervision of Scout Construction so as to comply with LEED standard for sustainability, minimizing waste and using readily renewable or recycled products throughout the construction process. 

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